Art in Bloom Video Available

Well here it is – our video of our Art in Bloom event during April’s meeting. This was a great event where members vocalized their ideas and how they came up with their designs. Each of them are fun to listen to, especially if you were there for the actual pieces.

Much thanks to those who organized and held this – Pam Sutton, Gotti Kelley who offered her suggestions for each artist, and our Co-Presidents, Joanne Mallon and Pam Marhan, who officiated that day.

Hopefully the video passes muster. Please forgive any glitches. It was a long, careful project after the fact, and all the features were carefully planned. A learning process, but worth the time spent.

 

 

 

 

Not-so-Shabby Chic

At 10 a.m. on May 8, our Club is going to hold our annual fund-raiser before our meeting. Advice is to get there early; things are priced to sell and may go very fast.

Among the stars are some small designs ready to take home for Mother’s Day, and home-made cards of which a portion of the sale will go to the Club.

Please come early, and enjoy some casual conversation and excitement over our speakers, who will talk to us about using native plants in our landscapes. Even the smallest and simplest of gardens can give back to nature without much effort. Talk about maintenance free gardening!

We look forward to seeing new and “seasoned” members tomorrow!

Check out some of our previous offerings:

Trip Planned to Chanticleer Gardens

Here is a link to our flyer. We will be enjoying a lovely day on June 6, with many new sights and even a lunch! All for an affordable price, and we think this is something you should check out. There are still some seats available on the bus, and you can get all the information at this link…

 

NAVESINK GARDEN CLUB TRIP TO CHANTICLEER GARDENS

 

From our Guest Blogger, Gotti

Click here for the more colorful article: Watch whom you invite to your garden party
or, read here:

Watch whom you invite to your garden party!

 Some guests are most unwelcome and soon push others to the sidelines. These are the assertive and belligerent plants, soon running wild, quickly filling every space and that of their neighbor. Quite often, gardeners, grateful for a different plant, will rue the day they set it in the ground.

 For example, most varieties of mint, while great to use in the kitchen, will invade and infiltrate a space before you realize it. My suggestion is to plant mint in a large container, no drainage holes and then sink the pot into the ground.

 Sweet Autumn Clematis, so beautiful in bloom, heavenly in scent and loved by bees, can be considered invasive. This plant happily scrambles with such energy during the summer, one has to admire it. If you have an odd spot in your garden, a patch of soil with poor growing conditions begging for some attention, then this is the plant for you.

 Common orange day lilies are often inherited in older gardens. They dig in their heels and refuse to budge. And while you may enjoy the faithful blooming each year, there comes a time when they must go, otherwise you drown in a sea of green leaves. But again, if you have lots of space, a generous spread of these sword-like leaves is an attractive sight during the summer.

 Gardening is intimately connected to the journey we all make to find a place for ourselves. It displays our “Jekyll and Hyde” attitude, which mediates between the urge to obliterate and our urge to preserve. Should you ruthlessly pull up plants that you once loved or should you close both eyes and give them another season? This decision is yours alone. Just remember – a garden must change; otherwise it becomes an antiquated affair.

 Don’t succumb to the black hole of time and energy by choosing high maintenance plants for your garden. Those divas who requite your continuous attention like spraying, dusting, dead-heading, tying, etc. Those who have to be coddled and are usually expensive. There is a national movement to create interest in our native plants, those than can weather harsh conditions, drought and air pollution, those that are less demanding and still reward you with their vigor and multi-season interest. Look for native plants in your garden center and nurseries.

 You know it is spring when crows mob hawks, and scores of robins devour the last red holly berries. And Spring is definitely here when you see robins in the grass, listen intently to detect worms. Spring is also heralded by the magnificent hellebores orientalis (Lenten Rose) in colors ranging from burgundy to hot pinks, and the dependable Vinca with its deep blue blossom who invite you to stop and admire.

 Now is the time to set out support for peonies before shoots become too tall.

Cut back Buddleia, Caryopteris and red twig dogwoods. All bloom on new growth. Prune roses when the buds begin to swell and when the forsythia blooms. Now is also the time to sit back, relax and enjoy nature’s beauty.

 

Gotti Kelley

Opportunity to Learn – Free!

Here is a wonderful opportunity to learn about garden topics, given by the Master Gardeners, who are among our members as well.

Spring is in the Air!

Spring is in the air!

Get more from your garden this year!
It is always exciting to get those first seeds safely tucked into the ground. But you
can get much more out of your space by using innovative techniques. Succession
planting is ideal for crops such as beans and salad greens because staggered seed
sowing will yield continuous harvests. It is a great way to get the most our of your
garden space.

The same garden space can be utilized go grow several different veggies through-
out the growing season. Follow a crop of spring vegetables, like spinach,
arugula, peas or scallions with summer vegetables like heat-loving cucumbers
tomatoes or squash. When fall arrives, plant lettuce, radishes or kale in that same
spot.

Interplanting is another good way to use your garden space to harvest the most. Plant
fast-maturing crops among ones that mature more slowly. Plant lettuce between young tomato seedlings or radish seeds alternately with carrot seeds.

Use people power and weed, prune and rake by hand whenever possible.
A tidy blanket of good organic mulch keeps your soil less stressed during the
summer.

Know your fertilizer needs. Many gardeners either under- or over-apply fertilizer. Contact your local Cooperative Extension office for specific sampling and instructions.
The numbers and letters on fertilizer bags like “NPK 29-2-4” represent the percentage
of each ingredient in the product by weight. N = nitrogen, helps with the greening in grass and encourages growth. P = phophorous, stimulates root growth and helps seeds to sprout. K = potassium helps grass withstand disease and drought.

Nature can cure what ails you. Research suggests that we are genetically hard-
wired to tap into Mother Nature’s great outdoors when we need to cure what ails us. Green surroundings improve mental alertness.

Determined-to-flower hellebores have been blooming in my garden for weeks,
shimmers of brilliance from “Josef Lemper”, “Pink Frost” and “Winter Bliss” blend
with naturalized snowdrops, deep-purple grape hyacinths, lavender colored Glory of the Snow and bright blue Scilla- the entire colorful show courting potential pollinators.

Spring is here – you can practically taste it.

 

Thank you, Gotti K. for this contribution to our website!

 

Form & Structure by Guest Blogger

We have a guest blogger!

Because of the harsh spring around here, many of our activities, although indoors, needed to be adjusted or even cancelled. That’s what happened to our drop-in this past week. However, Gotti K. was kind enough to let us share her offering, even though we had such bad weather.

Hoping you enjoy her words; her wisdom and generosity continue to inspire our club, even during these dreary days.


Form and Structure

A garden is both a haven and a laboratory – gardeners seek respite from stressful world. Gardeners seeks to simplify

Patterned foliage is the story of 2018

New Trends in Europe:

Hot colors are soft blues and blue greens, mauves, pink, reddish pink and orange-red.

Trendy with fashion and interior decorating styles now.

Blues and  blue-greens are great in a garden area of light shade. Think Hostas, ferns, grasses and sedge.

Hydrangeas new varieties: re-blooming, simpler to prune

tolerant to heat, humidity and wind.

Succulents are the 21st century houseplant infatuation

New cultivars: Great shrubs

Abelia grandiflora: Funshine – yellow, Pinky Bells – pink

Buddleia : Miss Pearl, Miss Violet, White, lilac, blue, purple

Quince: Peach, pink, scarlet

Blooming right now: Hellebores, Forsythia, Pussy Willow, Mahonia

Hosta: gardenworthy:

Blu

mouse ears hosta 7-14 small for ngc website.jpg

example of Mouse Ears hosta

e Mouse Ears 6″ tall,  Green Ice 2″ tall,Green Thumb miniature

 

Heuchera – Coral Bells, humidity tolerant

foliage ages to silver: Electric Plum, Pink Panther

Heucherella is a combination of Heuchera and Tiarella

Red Twig Dogwood – Arctic fire, Arctic Sun

Botanical diversity is better for insect pollinators

Off to the garden for healing, relaxation and mindfulness


 

Photos from NJ Home & Garden Show

Here they are!!!!

we’re adding them here to our Gallery page, but in the meanwhile, enjoy the preliminary offerings.

 

click here for NJ flower show!

Drop-in Tutorial starts our March Meeting

Our Horticulture Chair will do a Drop in tutorial at 10:30. She has a wealth of knowledge to give us. Come at 10:15 ,we will have the Business meeting at 11 am, followed by lunch. Our speaker will be Leslie Dempsey, at 1 pm presenting care of houseplants and outdoor Spring and Summer maintenance. With her Irish sense of humor it will be a fun meeting. Bring any problem plants and she will try to cure. Leslie can give tips on making our gardens shape up for the coming joy of Spring and Summer.
We look forward to seeing you all and welcoming our prospective members .

March Meeting – “SEASONAL CARE IN SPRING AND SUMMER”

046109043.JPGNAVESINK GARDEN CLUB

 PR Contact:  Joanne Mallon  ngcpublicity@gmail.com 

 THE NAVESINK GARDEN CLUB HOSTS  “SEASONAL CARE IN SPRING AND SUMMER”

Are you tired of winter?  Spring is just around the corner, so what are some things you can do to begin preparing your plants and garden for the sunshine months?

On  Tuesday, March 13th at 1p.m., the  Navesink Garden Club will host “Seasonal Care In Spring and Summer” featuring speaker Leslie Dempsey.  Just in time for St. Patrick’s Day,  Leslie, who is known for her lectures that are peppered with Irish humor,  will be giving a delightful presentation that focuses on spring and preparing for a summer outside.  Leslie is the sole proprietor of Leslie Dempsey Home Plant Care with over 20 years’ experience in garden maintenance and outdoor “minding”.  As part of the program, Leslie invites you to bring in your plants for diagnosis and help.

The public is invited to attend this program free of charge at The Atrium at Navesink Harbor, 40 Riverside Avenue, Red Bank, NJ.

The Navesink Garden Club invites people interested in horticulture and design to attend our meetings, enjoy a warm and friendly welcome and learn what interesting projects the club engages in.  Meetings are held on the second Tuesday of the month from September to June at the Atrium.  The business meeting begins at 11 a.m. and the program at 1 p.m.  Visit us at www.navesinkgardenclub.org  for information on our current happenings.

The Navesink Garden Club is a member of The Garden Club of New. Jersey, Inc.  Members come from far and wide.  For additional information about the club and its programs, contact Membership Chair, Terry,  by emailing her at http://www.cweed7@outlook.com.  Like us on Facebook.

 

 

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